Riverdale ep. 3.6 “Chapter Forty-One: Manhunter”

The core four of Riverdale are supposed to be smart (ok, maybe not you, Archie). Many of the adults around them are clever. So this week’s episode apparently wants us to believe that they’re all really stupid.

Archie is continuing his life on the run. Still in Dilton’s bunker, the boy becomes restless. He coerces Kevin into helping him investigate the supposed witness living at the mines.

Veronica warns him away, believe that she can discover something in his case files that will be useful. Keep in mind that a super-sleuth Betty (who helped solve one murder and catch a serial killer) and professional lawyers studied the case ALL SUMMER.

Conveniently, Veronica discovers a blatant case of footage doctoring. Sheriff Minetta’s cup is full one second, then skips to it being empty. It’s not even subtle, kids. But Veronica finds the key to Archie’s innocence in one afternoon that a group of trained adults couldn’t find in three months.

Regardless, Archie goes with Kevin to the mines. They see Minetta there, which raises their suspicions. When they find the bodies in the mine (which, by the way, is loaded with G&G markings), they’re, well, bodies. All but one that is, and they decide to take the survivor to the hospital despite the risk that Archie could be caught.

Only Archie isn’t caught. Veronica breaks into her mother’s mayoral office and finds the unedited footage on the computer. All conveniently under the password of her birthday. She manages to send off the email with the real footage before being arrested.

Meanwhile, Betty and Jughead continue their quest to find the Gargoyle King. Jughead reveals to Betty that he followed the GK to a clearing where many masked gargoyle-types sat around a fire like a giant worshiping gang.

Betty returns home in the morning and learns about the prison warden’s death. When she questions Alice about it, Alice claims to know nothing about the man. But a quick look at the Riverdale High year books prove otherwise; he was the RROTC instructor when the Midnight Club were at school.

Betty then gets the silly idea to trick all the parents together for a chat. Unsurprisingly, it doesn’t lead anywhere. But Penelope blames Dilton Doiley’s dad of poisoning the chalices years before. Though, if I recall, neither her nor Mr Doiley claimed to be the game master the night Principal Featherhead dead.

It’s pretty convenient to blame the dead guy, so all the parents leave. But nothing is quite as it seems, of course. When Betty examines the autopsy report, she discovers that Dilton’s father didn’t die of suicide, but was most likely poisoned.

She uncovers that many of the adults (namely former-sheriff Keller and Alice) helped with the murder’s cover-up.

Jughead meanwhile tracks down Joaquin, who is looking a bit worse for wear. Joaquin is pretty tight-lipped, just filling in the information that the warden was playing with a pack of cards given to him. And that the warden had to kill Archie, as the game told him to. But Joaquin does lead him to one very unsurprising suspect: Hiram.

Hiram claims to know nothing, of course. But he does do a very good job in getting dragged into every horrible thing that has ever happened in that city.

Joaquin doesn’t last very long after Jughead’s interrogation. He’s found in the Serpents’ camp with blue lips and the Gargoyle King’s mark on him.

Despite the fact that Archie’s name is cleared (all of camera). It’s pretty convenient. It’s also all happens pretty damn fast. Veronica begins to prepare for Archie’s welcome back party when she gets a call from him. He ends their relationship. He claims that with Hiram around, he and anyone who loves him will be a target. Which, when you think about it, makes Hiram pretty pathetic. Doesn’t he have any better schemes than taking down a 16-year-old?

Archie and Jughead head off into the sunset together. It’s likely to hinder Jughead’s investigation into the King, but in fairness, FP did handcuff him to a fridge.

Speaking of FP, the man looks might suspicious these days. When Betty and Alice are alone one night, the power goes out. They discover that the Gargoyle King is in their living room. They rush upstairs to hide, and discover that the remains of Dilton’s father is laid out on a bed with his tombstone.

FP conveniently climbs through the window at that moment. Alice tells him that the Gargoyle King is downstairs. But instead of charging to find him, he simple hugs Alice. Which is a very FP thing to do.

The following morning, Alice tells Betty that she’s decided to go to the Farm to be safe. Betty is thus dragged off to the Sisters of Quiet Mercy. Each season the Riverdale writers give us another reason to hate these ladies.

While Betty being locked up should seem like a bad thing, she discovers that those around her are worshiping the Gargoyle King.

Josie has a seizure at school, and I’m pretty certain at this point all arrows should be pointing at the Farm. They have to have a link to all this G&G stuff or what’s the point? Alice has pretty close ties to both the Sisters (whom she stayed with and sent her eldest daughter to) and the Farm.

Perhaps this love affair of FP and Alice’s is the root of all the evil. That would be pretty fun. But also I think poor Betty has suffered enough in the horrible-parents realm.

Too much of this episode seemed too rushed. Plotlines that could have been better fleshed-out were so conveniently wrapped up that it feels like the writers think we’re all idiots. And if that’s not the case, they should probably stop writing their characters and plotlines as such.

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